Friday, November 22, 2019
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Prudential Insurance Tips Ugandans On Deadly Non-Communicable Diseases

Prudential Insurance has taken a step to equip Ugandans with vital knowledge on how to deal with Non-Communicable Diseases (NCDs).

A non-communicable disease (NCD) is a disease that is not transmissible directly from one person to another. NCDs include Parkinson’s disease, autoimmune diseases, strokes, most heart diseases, most cancers, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, Alzheimer’s disease, cataracts, and others.

In order to help Ugandans prevent the above diseases, Prudential held a two-day camp starting on Thursday   at Constitution Square and Ugandans thronged the place to get free medical check-ups and inquiries.

According to the Prudential Managing Director East Africa, Arjun Mallik, the insurance company introduced a medical scheme to provide insurance coverage for acute and chronic diseases exposed from the high prevalence of NCDs in Uganda.

“We felt challenged to make a contribution in reversing this trend and playing our role in making Ugandans healthy so that they can live longer and active fulfilling lives,” Mallik said.

The 2014 national survey published by the World Health Organisation and Ministry of Health indicates that 1/4 adults has high blood pressure which is the major cause of heart disease and other heart related complications.

Mallik said that their two-month long campaign has involved dissemination of prevention tips to over 10 million people through selected radio and television stations.

The 2014 World Health Organisation survey shows that 100,000 people die annually in Uganda due to NCDs.

Prudential’s first edition was held in August last year and 2000 people were able to access free heart related medical check-ups.

“It was shocking to find out that 23% of the attendees were considered to be obese, 19% diabetic and 27% were found to be hypertensive and some of them didn’t know they had these conditions,” Mallik revealed.

State Minister for Health Sarah Opendi said that government has taken various measures in the Tobacco control Act, Narcotics and Substance abuse to control heart related diseases.

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